Taking More of Ren’s Secrets: 5 Tips for Successful Pick-ups (Article/Tutorial)

Posted by on Mar 22, 2016 | 0 comments

Discussing the next set-up on the Ren pick-ups shoot with director Kate Madison.

Discussing the next set-up on the Ren pick-ups shoot with director Kate Madison. Photo: Michael Hudson

Last summer I was involved in pick-ups shoots for a couple of projects I lensed the previous year: action-comedy feature The Gong Fu Connection and fantasy series Ren. Both pick-up shoots were strange experiences, featuring some very familiar aspects of the original shoot – locations, sets, costumes – but noticeably lacking others – certain actors, crew members and so on. The Ren pick-ups in particular were like re-living principal photography in microcosm, with stressful crowd shoots followed by more relaxed, smaller scenes and finally night shots with flaming arrows again!

A CTB-gelled Arrilite 1000 stands in for the 2.5K HMI used for backlight during principal photography on Ren!

A CTB-gelled Arrilite 1000 stands in for the 2.5K HMI used for backlight during principal photography on Ren! Photo: Michael Hudson

I’ve blogged previously about how a director/producer can prepare for pick-ups – by keeping certain key props and costumes, for example – but today I have a few thoughts from a DP’s perspective.

1. Keep a record of lighting plans. I have a pretty good memory for my lighting set-ups, but not everyone does, so keeping notes is a good idea. Your gaffer may even do this for you. I frequently use this blog as a means of recording lighting set-ups, and indeed tried to access it during the Ren pick-ups shoot but was foiled by dodgy wifi.

2. Keep camera logs. On a properly crewed shoot this will be the 2nd AC’s job. The logs should include at least the following info for each slate: lens, aperture, ASA, white balance and shutter angle. This can be useful in principal photography too, for example if you shoot the two parts of a shot-reverse at different ends of the day or different days all together, and need to make sure you use the same lens.

Production assistant Claire Finn tends the brazier which provides smoke in the absence of a smoke gun.

Production assistant Claire Finn tends the brazier which provides smoke in the absence of the Artem smoke gun used during principal photography. Photo: Michael Hudson

3. Have the original scene handy when you shoot the pick-ups. Load the edit onto a laptop or tablet so that you can compare it on set to the new material you’re framing up.

4. Own a bit of lighting kit if you can. In the shed I have some battered old Arrilites and a few other bits and pieces of gear that has seen better days. On a proper shoot I would leave this at home and have the production hire much better kit. But for pick-ups, when there’s often no money left, this stuff can come in handy.

5. Keep gels. If you employ an unusual colour of gel during principal photography, try to keep a piece of it in case you need to revisit that lighting set-up in pick-ups. Production will have to pay for the gel once it’s been used anyway. On the Ren pick-ups shoot, after pulling all of my gels out of the plastic kitchen bin I keep them in, I was relieved to find that I still had two pieces of the Urban Sodium gel I used in the flaming arrows scene the first time around.

Urban Sodium gel provides the grungy orange light for the flaming arrows scene, just as it did last November.

Urban Sodium gel provides the grungy orange light for the flaming arrows scene, just as it did last November. Photo: Hermes Contreras

You can watch Ren: The Girl with the Mark right now at rentheseries.com.

This article has been reprinted by MFM with my express permission.  You can learn more about this and my other work as a cinematographer, gaffer, and director at NeilOseman.com.

I'm a director of photography with 18 years' industry experience. My recent feature credits include The Little Mermaid (starring Shirley MacLaine), Heretiks (starring Clare "Hellraiser" Higgins) and additional photography on The Etruscan Smile with Brian Cox. In 2016 I was awarded Best Cinematography at Festigious International Film Festival for my work on the short drama Night Owls. Second only to my love of cinematography is my passion for sharing what I learn, which I do through my blog and my Instagram feed.

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